Music and Medieval Manuscripts

Paleography and Performance

Music and Medieval Manuscripts Website price:£81.00 (Regular price: £90.00)
  • Imprint: Ashgate
  • Illustrations: Includes 31 b&w illustrations and 48 music examples
  • Published: May 2004
  • Format: 234 x 156 mm
  • Extent: 472 pages
  • Binding: Hardback
  • ISBN: 978-0-7546-0991-9
  • ISBN Short: 9780754609919
  • BL Reference: 780.9'02
  • LoC Control No: 2003062878
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  • Edited by John Haines, University of Toronto, Canada and Randall Rosenfeld
  • The interdisciplinary approach of Music and Medieval Manuscripts is modeled on the work of the scholar to whom the book is dedicated. Professor Andrew Hughes is recognized internationally for his work on medieval manuscripts, combining the areas of paleography, performance, liturgy and music.

    All these areas of research are represented in this collection with an emphasis on the continuity between the physical characteristics of medieval manuscripts and their different uses. Albert Derolez provides a landmark and controversial essay on the origins of pre-humanistic script, while Margaret Bent proposes a new interpretation of a famous passage from a fifteenth-century poem by Martin Le Franc. Timothy McGee contributes an innovative essay on late-medieval music, text and rhetoric. David Hiley discusses musical changes and variation in the offices of a major saint’s feast, and Craig Wright presents an original study of Guillaume Dufay. Jan Ziolkowski treats the topic of neumed classics, an under-explored aspect of the history of medieval pedagogy and the transmission of texts.

    The essays that comprise this volume offer a unique focus on medieval manuscripts from a wide range of perspectives, and will appeal to musicologists and medievalists alike.

  • Contents: Introduction; Andrew Hughes in focus; Part I Paleography: The script reform of Petrarch: an Illusion?, Albert Derolez; Tres digiti scribunt: a typology of late-antique and medieval pen grips, Randall Rosenfeld; Erasures in 13th-century music, John Haines; Part II Music: The musical stanzas in Martin Le Franc's Le Champion des Dames, Margaret Bent; Women's lament and the Neuming of the classics, Jan M. Ziolkowski; Baghdadi rhythmic theories and practices in 12th-century Andalusia, George Dimitri Sawa; Problems and possibilities in the performance of Trent 93's Polyphonic Introits, Brian E. Power; Music, rhetoric and the emperor's new clothes,Timothy J. McGee; Part III Drama: 15th-century Yorkshire drama: a hypothesis, Alexandra F. Johnston; Civic musicians in Wales and the Marches, 1430–1642, David Klausner; A few odd visits: unusual settings of the Visitatio sepulchri, Carol Symes; Part IV Liturgy: Dufay's motet Balsamus et munda cera and the papal ceremony of the Agnus Dei, Craig Wright; Origins and affiliations of the pre-sarum office for Anne in the Stowe breviary, Sherry Reames; Early cycles of office chants for the Feast of Mary Magdalene, David Hiley; The Kenilworth Missal (Chichester cathedral, MS Med. 2), Richard Pfaff; Publications of Andrew Hughes; Index.

  • Reviews: '... well worth dipping into: you will probably read more than you intended.' Early Music Review

    '... a rewarding volume both to dip into and to use for specialised reference purpose. Its diversity should attract a wide range of readers...' Church Music Quarterly

    '... [a] fine collection...' Notes

    ‘In this collection of essays, edited by a musicologist with profound interests in paleography (John Haines) and a codicologist who is a specialist in the performance of early music (Randall Rosenfeld), a diverse group has 'written well', offering a 'good day' to scholars and performers alike… [a] fine collection…’ Muse