European Perceptions of Terra Australis

European Perceptions of Terra Australis Website price:$121.46 (Regular price: $134.95)
  • Imprint: Ashgate
  • Illustrations: Includes 52 b&w illustrations
  • Published: February 2012
  • Format: 234 x 156 mm
  • Extent: 334 pages
  • Binding: Hardback
  • Other editions: ebook PDF, ebook ePUB
  • ISBN: 978-1-4094-2605-9
  • ISBN Short: 9781409426059
  • BL Reference: 919.4'042-dc22
  • LoC Control No: 2011026572
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  • Edited by Anne M. Scott, University of Western Australia, Alfred Hiatt, Queen Mary, University of London, Claire McIlroy, University of Western Australia, and Christopher Wortham, University of Western Australia
  • Terra Australis - the southern land - was one of the most widespread concepts in European geography from the sixteenth to the eighteenth centuries, although the notion of a land mass in the southern seas had been prevalent since classical antiquity. Despite this fact, there has been relatively little sustained scholarly work on European concepts of Terra Australis or the intellectual background to European voyages of discovery and exploration to Australia in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. Through interdisciplinary scholarly contributions, ranging across history, the visual arts, literature and popular culture, this volume considers the continuities and discontinuities between the imagined space of Terra Australis and its subsequent manifestation. It will shed new light on familiar texts, people and events - such as the Dutch and French explorations of Australia, the Batavia shipwreck and the Baudin expedition - by setting them in unexpected contexts and alongside unfamiliar texts and people. The book will be of interest to, among others, intellectual and cultural historians, literary scholars, historians of cartography, the visual arts, women's and post-colonial studies.

  • Contents: Perceptions, Anne M. Scott; Terra Australis and the idea of the Antipodes, Alfred Hiatt; The Roman South, Bill Leadbetter; Meanings of the South: from the Mappaemundi to Shakespeare's Othello, Christopher Wortham; Terra Australis, Jave la Grande and Australia: identity problems and fiction, W.A.R. (Bill) Richardson; Mapping Terra Australis in the French 17th century: the Mémoires of the Abbé Jean Paulmier, Margaret Sankey; Ceremonial encounters: Spanish perceptions of the South Pacific 1567–1794, Mercedes Maroto Camino; Naming and shaming: the Baudin expedition and the politics of nomenclature in the Terres Australes, Jen Fornasiero and John West-Sooby; Who do you trust? Discrepancies between the 'official and unofficial' sources recording explorers' perceptions of places and their people, Michael McCarthy; 'My own slender remarks': global networks of slavery and sociability in Mary Ann Parker's Voyage to New South Wales (1795), Katrina O'Loughlin; Recovering the imperial context of the mid-Victorian exploration of Northern Australia, 1855–57, Norman Etherington; The wicked and the fair: changing perceptions of Terra Australis through the prism of the Batavia shipwreck (1629), Leigh T.I. Penman; Bibliography; Index.

  • About the Editor: Anne M. Scott is editor of the journal Parergon and an honorary research fellow in English and Cultural Studies at the University of Western Australia. Her recent books include Piers Plowman and the Poor (Dublin, 2004) and, with Andrew Lynch, Renaissance Poetry and Drama in Context (Newcastle, 2008).
    Alfred Hiatt is a Reader in English Literature at Queen Mary, University of London. He is the author of Terra Incognita: Mapping the Antipodes before 1600 (London and Chicago, 2008).
    Claire McIlroy is a Research Associate for international liaison in the Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence for the History of Emotions based at the University of Western Australia. She is also an honorary research fellow in the School of Social and Cultural Studies at the University of Western Australia, and author of The English prose treatises of Richard Rolle (Woodbridge, 2004).
    Christopher Wortham is an Emeritus Professor and Senior Honorary Research Fellow in English and Cultural Studies at the University of Western Australia. He is also Professor of Theatre Studies and English Literature at the University of Notre Dame Australia in Fremantle. He has published widely on Renaissance poetry and drama.

  • Reviews: 'The book is of interest, among others, to cultural historians, historians of science, historians of cartography, the visual arts, and to scholars in the history of slavery and post-colonial studies. The Editors of this Volume have done a fine job by arranging all references into one single bibliography list at the end of the book: as such, the reader has access to one alphabetical list of about 30 pages of sources and references. The book contains more than 50 figures, mostly zonal maps and charts, world maps, and also reproductions of painted landscapes and portraits.' Journal of Astronomical Data

    'European Perceptions of ‘Terra Australis’ offers a treasure trove of ideas, insights, and further reading to explore, with useful illustrations and a comprehensive bibliography. The essays provide updates on contemporary debates in the field, bring into focus some little-known texts, and provide fresh interdisciplinary insights on a fascinating field.' Parergon

  • Extracts from this title are available to view:

    Full contents list

    Introduction

    Index